Culpepper Disgust Image Set (C-DIS)

Abstract

The Culpepper Disgust Image Set (C-DIS; Culpepper et al., 2018) consists of 20 pathogen-salient and 20 pathogen-free images which can be used to assess disgust in experimental settings (through the presentation of the pathogen-salient set of images) and to measure individual variability in disgust sensitivity (by viewing both the pathogen-salient and pathogen-free images). Developed within the context of shedding light on disease-avoidance processes and for the purpose of providing a reliable alternative to Curtis, Aunger, & Rabie’s (2004) images of disease-salient stimuli, measure construction employed a multi-stage, bottom-up item-generation process that sought to determine the most widespread and effective elicitors of disgust across several cultures (English, Czech, and Spanish speakers). Psychometric evaluation of the final version of C-DIS was conducted via online survey with participants responding from 19 countries. Findings detailing the measure’s factor structure, internal consistency, and convergent validity were presented. Demographic characteristics of the online sample and decisions made regarding item distinctiveness were discussed as possible limiting factors. (PsycTests Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Publication
PsycTESTS
Jan Havlíček
Jan Havlíček
Professor

Professor and principal investigator of the Human Ethology research group (Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic).

Juan David Leongómez
Juan David Leongómez
Associate Professor

My research interests include mate choice and human vocal communication, with an aspiration towards understanding musicality. I am also interested in bioacoustics and psychoacoustics, as well as statistics and  programming.

S. Craig Roberts
S. Craig Roberts
Professor of Human Ethology

Professor of Human Ethology (Division of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK), and President of the International Society for Human Ethology (ISHE).

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